Some of the early settlers in the state of Selangor were the Bugis and Javanese from the islands of Sulawesi and Java respectively.

They brought with them the the cultures and traditions and like most migrant communities tweaked it a little here and there to suit local tastes and adapt by using local ingredients.

These are just some of the many dishes you’d find in Selangor.

Pecal

A traditional Javanese salad like appetiser made with vegetables and topped with mouth-watering peanut sauce. It is sometimes served with Ketupat or Lontong. The preparation is simple so you can easily try it at home. The key ingredients to prepare this dish are peanuts or groundnuts for the gravy (kuah), tofu, bean sprout, long beans and cucumber.

Pecal
(Pix: Tourism Selangor / maggie.com.my)

Nasi Ambeng

Served during large gatherings (kenduri) in a platter which can be shared with four to five people per serving, this Javanese-Malay dish consists of fragrant rice served up with side dishes like chicken, fried noodles, long beans and tempe – usually on a banana leaf.

Nasi Ambeng
Pix: Tourism Selangor / Nona Manis Kitchen, Cyberjaya

Sambal Taun

Sambal Taun or sambal tahun was introduced to Selangor by early Javanese settlers, and over time has become a traditional food in this central state of Malaysia. This dish is not for the faint hearted as it’s main feature is the spicy kick it gives from copious amounts of chilli used in its preparation. The chili is mixed with ingredients like red onions, garlic and shrimp paste to create a sambal base, which is then sautéed in oil before coconut milk, tamarind paste, salt and sugar are added. This is then cooked with beef skin, but clams, beef lungs and anchovies are sometimes used as an alternative to beef skin. This dish is usually served during the annual Hari Raya / Eid celebration.

Sambal Taun
(Pix: Tourism Selangor / salamisimon1.blogspot.com)

Wadai Kipeng

In the tongue of the Banjar people who originate from the island of Borneo, ‘Wadai’ means ‘Kuih’ (cake/dessert) while ‘Kipeng’ refers to pieces. As the name suggests, it is a sweet porridge-like dessert, made with glutinous rice flour, coconut, palm sugar, granulated sugar and some pandan leaves. Sweet desserts like this is a must for the Banjar community’s thanksgiving ceremony.

Wadai Kipeng
(Pix: Tourism Selangor / friedchilies.com)

Bahulu Kemboja

Known as an ‘old-timers’ favourite, this traditional ‘kuih’ is still much sought after today. Bahulu Kemboja is easily available, and usually eaten as a breakfast or teatime snack. To ensure that this ‘kuih’ is moist and fresh only natural ingredients are used like naturally derived pandan essence, wheat flour, rice flour, coconut milk, eggs, a pinch of salt, sugar and sesame seeds for its topping.

Bahulu Kemboja
(Pix: Tourism Selangor / manis2012)

More articles on things to see and do in Selangor:

Avani Sepang Gold Coast

Food Trail: Seaside Sojurn

Sunset: Morib Beach

Unmasking the Mah Meri

For more on Selangor visit Tourism Selangor at https://selangor.travel/

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